Working With Young Women

Working With Young Women by Vanessa Rogers
Price: 
£17.99
ISBN: 
978-1-84905-095-1

Packed with fun sessions and practical group activities, Work with Young Women presents a multitude of opportunities for young women to build self-esteem, confidence and assertiveness.

From art activities to life story work, the author offers ideas for a wide range of projects, games, discussions, drama and role-play to engage and motivate. Issues covered include body image, positive relationships, bullying, keeping safe and healthy lifestyles. This second edition has also been updated and includes a new section on gender and stereotyping. The book features guidelines for facilitating effective group work, ideas on how to get started, and evaluation techniques to end on a positive note. The activities are appropriate for all young women aged 13 to 19, and include suggestions for those who have special educational needs and adaptations for one-to-one work.

This book will be essential reading for anyone working with young women, including youth workers, PSHE teachers, pupil referral unit workers, Youth Offending Teams and voluntary sector youth leaders. 

Reviews: 

I run a girl's youth club in Leicestershire and your books and resourcs have been invaluable to us. They are clear and very user-friendly, especially helpful for our junior leaders as we spend the majority of our time developing social skills.

Fiona Burke,  IG Girls UK, January 2012

NSPCC Online Library Review

"A collection of ideas for practical sessions and group activities which present opportunities for young women to build self-esteem, confidence and assertiveness. The author offers ideas for a wide range of projects, games, discussions, drama, role-play, art activities, and life story work to engage and motivate young women. Issues covered include body image, positive relationships, bullying, personal safety and healthy lifestyles. This second edition has been updated and includes a new section on gender and stereotyping. Also includes guidelines for facilitating effective group work, ideas on how to get started, and evaluation techniques. The activities are appropriate for all young women aged 13 to 19, and includes suggestions for those who have special educational needs and adaptations for one-to-one work."

Community Practitioner

"This book contains a cornucopia of ideas to keep a group of young women entertained for hours. It has been developed out of the author's many years as a teacher and youth worker, and is an ideal companion for those new to delivering personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE).
The book is well structured and very easy to follow. It starts with the basics - how to form a viable group, what is the optimum size of this group and how to agree ground rules. It then moves on to describe icebreaking games and warm-up activities. Nurses will recognise the 'forming, storming, norming, performing' elements of group dynamics.
Issues covered are general 'self themes, such as personal values and body image and self-esteem, healthy lifestyles, relationships, gender and stereotypes, anger and conflict management, through to action planning for positive change. There are plenty of ideas for discussions based on role play, card games, quizzes and even Jenga. The scenarios are realistic, thought provoking and supportive. It is not exactly a behaviour change model, as this is education, and plainly the understanding is that the young woman would choose to re-evaluate and change her outlook.
There are some interesting themes touched upon - gender stereotyping around jobs and careers, sex and the media, women in society, women in parliament and International Women's Day, though perhaps not enough about the place of women in developing countries.
The 'healthy lifestyles' chapter covers stress, smoking, alcohol, risk-taking behaviour, healthy eating and drugs. There is an excellent idea of increasing knowledge and access to health services using a treasure hunt game.
The usefulness of this book is that the practitioner who is asked to do one or two lessons on a subject could quickly check what has already been covered, and then deliver an effective, evidence-based session."

Reviewed by: Ros Godson, Unite/CPHVA Professional Officer
Date: 1st June 2010